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Blogger Bailey  |  4/22/2016 8:10 PM  |  Flag  
The mother coughed? Coughed? Are you kidding me? I've never known any normal animal to have such an averse reaction to a cough. And then it didn't murder the person who coughed, but the baby? I know pits are unpredictable and the farthest thing from a normal animal, but geez, everything about this sounds too weird. If any animal is set into kill mode because of a cough, that animal shouldn't be allowed in human society period.

And furthermore, who the hell lets a dog, let alone a frankenmauler pit, near a 3 day old baby?

Blogger Disgusted with Pits  |  4/23/2016 12:02 AM  |  Flag  
Perhaps the dog was spooked. A three-day old baby? Probably just came home from the hospital and the dog didn't quite know what to make of it yet. I'm completely against that breed, for this very reason. They're good dogs until they're not, then it's too late. That breed needs to be extinct. Yes, I blame the breed. I'm sure these parents didn't raise their dog to be a killer then allow it near their baby.

Blogger Dayna Hamilton  |  4/23/2016 7:57 AM  |  Flag  
A 3 day old infant is incredibly vulnerable. I never let my dogs sleep on the bed, even so, when I brought home my babies from the hospital I was extremely cautious with my Newfoundland/Border Collie mix. This is what pit bull advocacy/lobbyist groups are doing. They are convincing people that 'if raised properly', these are safe dogs with children, when the opposite is true.

Blogger Sarah  |  4/23/2016 2:22 PM  |  Flag  
The comments on the news stories are something else - pure conjecture that the owners must have been abusing the poor dog and "there's more to the story," which if it's not in MaulTalk already, ought to be.

Something I've noticed about pit bulls and the owners is a heightened tendency to be all over each other - how many times have you seen loving owner photos on FB of the family pit lying on top of the owner, or the owner and the pit spooning on a couch? Remember the pit mix that killed Suzanne Story, and the photo of it basically standing on the former owner? I think the bigger, heavier breeds tend to literally throw their weight around and the humans who are drawn to them enjoy it too, so you get a lot of wrestling/cuddling behavior being initiated by the dog. Most people with big dogs have a basic sense that it's not a great idea and limit it, but pit bull owner culture is so warped by the drive to prove they're safe that they can't see reality beyond the PR - that all dogs need to respect physical boundaries around humans, and aggressive breeds need that in spades.
A grown dog should be affectionate and loving, but it shouldn't be clambering all over you and licking you relentlessly. Dogs that do that are neurotic and pushy, not cute and sweet.

Blogger mary conner  |  4/24/2016 3:20 AM  |  Flag  
One pit bull attack after the other. When will the pit advocates get their heads out of the sand? I blame this on the breed and the parents for exposing this innocent baby to a pit bull in the first place. Oh I forgot, I also blame all the pit advocates, shelters included, for advertising this breed as a safe family pet. Shame on them.

Blogger Jaloney  |  4/24/2016 11:24 AM  |  Flag  
Horribly evil deception should be a CRIME and the animal control head should be Fired ASAP. Stop protecting pitbulls and start telling the truth about the number one BABY KILLER!

OpenID truthbirdtoo  |  4/24/2016 1:08 PM  |  Flag  
So the pit bull was neutered -- red flag number 1. Regular old pit bull owners consistently fail to spay and neuter. One must assume this is a younger couple and the dog is a RESCUE. That is the reason why the dog is neutered; they adopted it from a rescue agency neutered. Or, they even adopted it from a San Diego County shelter. DeSousa could say with real knowledge, "the dog has never shown aggression before" if he had access to the dog's records (AKA if the dog had already been in the shelter system). If the dog was rehomed to this family, there would be more reason than ever for DeSousa to obfuscate the breed's name: to lessen the blow to the rescue agency (assuming this information ever comes out at all). Red flag number 2. We don't know if the mother actually coughed or where the dog was on the bed. The number of "we don't knows" about this case are daunting. That is red flag #2, the number of unknowns. Some of this will be resolved after the coroner's report. Red flag number 3. The 911 calls made by the parents happened at about 7:30 pm. They ended up driving the baby to the hospital. Child Abuse Unit arrived at 8 pm, but police do not have the dog hauled away by animal control until after midnight. For four hours, the dog was just secured in the home -- like police did NOT know if a bite had occurred at all. They had to wait on word from the hospital.

Blogger BeKind StopbreedingBullyDogs  |  4/24/2016 10:14 PM  |  Flag  
Seems to me that pits do not respect the personal space of others. That's essential for dog fighting.

Some accounts of pits killing humans mention the pit licking the victim after death. (Cathy Wheatcraft, Cindy Whisman).yuck!

They are just as aggressive away from home, even entering the homes of others, to attack and kill.(Robin Elgie)

Non bully dogs know when they are on the property of others, and respect that. If a young adult large non bully normal dog enters an older small dog's yard, the smaller old dog can snap, nip and correct the larger younger dog, and the larger younger dog will back off and not fight.

Blogger Christy D  |  4/26/2016 7:12 AM  |  Flag  
There are so many wrongs here. I couldn't help but make a list:
1. Owning a pit bull or any other large game/attack breed.
2. Having a large breed dog in a tiny apartment.
3. Having a large breed dog and no fenced in yard.
4. Having any dog near a newborn.
5. Having no boundaries with a large breed dog and the owner's bed.
6. Blaming 911 for the baby's death.

OpenID truthbirdtoo  |  4/26/2016 9:56 AM  |  Flag  
Amen Christy.

Blogger Small Survivors  |  4/27/2016 3:20 PM  |  Flag  
Very insightful update! I am going to remember that what makes dogs safe and appropriate companions is that they “prefer a response that does not involve violence.” They prefer to avoid conflict. They prefer to flee when confused or scared. And they have “acquired bite inhibition.”

The exerpt on jealousy is excellent as well. I bought a digital copy of the the book, and it is full of great insights like this exerpt.

Blogger Linda Matthews  |  4/27/2016 4:17 PM  |  Flag  
After our pet was killed by pits in our yard the male actually laid down on top of the dogs body He would leave and pee on everything then come back and literally lay down on her dead, bloody, body Notice I said he the pit and she the victim dog. I am 61 years old and have done rescue work I have no experience with pits They never used to be in the general population. I knew as I helplessly watched waiting on animal control that I was seeing something that was completely outside of how normal dogs behave. I don't believe this dog was behaving out of character for the breed. I will do my utmost to educate myself and protect my family with what I am able to learn I will be prepared to stop another attack if it comes without endangering myself. I will never have a false sense of thinking I know pits because I know dogs. Period. they are different. Period. They are deadly. Period.
Now where do we go as a society?

Blogger B Cazz  |  4/28/2016 4:54 PM  |  Flag  
This quote deserves repeating again and again:

The normal domestic dog is a conflict avoider. At startle or threat, it will try first of all to increase distance and assess the situation. It will seek to compose an appropriate response, preferring a response that does not involve violence. If startled by a child (or anything else) in a position where it can’t instantly increase distance, a normal dog might lash out with an open-jawed bat to an approaching body part. A normal dog might do a pressureless grab at that body part. A puncture wound, some torn skin, a bruising could result -- but not a death. The normal dog will flee the situation as soon as a flight route opens up. It will not respond to startle by jumping up and gripping the head of anything that happens to be close by, applying full jaw pressure, and refusing to let go.

OpenID joelande  |  4/29/2016 1:25 AM  |  Flag  
they set this up

There's a reason that these abandoned pit bulls end up in shelters. They have already had issues

But No Kill is only interested in selling ASAP and they set up the inevitable attacks

These shelters and their boards of directors need to be held accountable

Blogger I want a cute purse  |  4/29/2016 1:13 PM  |  Flag  
I don't understand how something so fact based as the dangers of Pitbulls is so subject to emotion and opinion. It's simple as math... When a pitbull attacks, was it ever worth the red-faced debate? The "look how snuggley my Pit is" pics? Burying your child?

Blogger Your Quiet Neighbor  |  4/30/2016 8:14 AM  |  Flag  
Want to hold the shelters and rescues accountable? File lawsuits. Big ones. It's BSL -- Breed-specific litigation -- in action.

Blogger PutMeInCharge41Day  |  4/30/2016 9:34 AM  |  Flag  
I hope this family and the family of the child killed by the other "adopted" pit bull get great lawyers and pursue legal action against these shelters.

I think that is the only way we could see less of these dogs put back out in the public.

Blogger Ruby Rose  |  5/01/2016 10:20 AM  |  Flag  
The pounds also lie. Last winter I took my grandsons to the pound looking for a collie. Every dog there was a pit or a pit mix. The only one which didn't bark viciously at us was obviously part lab and about 8 months old. The girl insisted on bringing it out for us to see. I told her I didn't want it because it was obviously part pit. She insisted it was a lab. No retriever ever had a jaw like that. She also excused the other dogs vicious behavior by saying they had been caged for a while and as a result they developed 'territory defense' or something like that and that is common behavior in caged animals. In other words they were protecting their territory. This was not my 1st rodeo. In days past dogs in the pound would bark excitedly at people who walked through but they did not viciously lunge at the cage in a very intimidating manner. So we went into a 'visiting' room which was set up like a living room with couch and chairs. I've had labs before and they can be overly exuberant especially when they are young. This dog was all over the place. I was happy to read the other comments and learn a term for this behavior which is so common in pits- it had no personal boundaries. It was rude and pushy and the kids were afraid of it. I never had any intentions of bringing it home and the visiting room experience only reinforced my decision. The girl working there was a very young (teenager) volunteer. She had been mislead, or perhaps taught to lie about these dangerous dogs. A person with less experience with dogs might have believed her lies and brought the dog home thinking they had a lab. The pounds should be held accountable for these deaths. My recent experience has shown me they are misleading at best and flat out liars at worst.

Blogger Your Quiet Neighbor  |  5/01/2016 12:22 PM  |  Flag  
Lawsuits. Big lawsuits. They will stop the shelter pit-pushing epidemic in its tracks.

Ditto for the so-called rescue groups. Sue 'em into the ground.

Blogger Da Ninja  |  5/01/2016 7:55 PM  |  Flag  

Would-be adoptors of dogs need to be a new kind of Adopter now - you have to go to a Shelter psychologically loaded for bear. If you DON'T, if you don't prepare for the pity/sympathy/outsider mentality/emotional bribery 'push' directed at you, you will be bringing home a dog that can kill you with absolute delight when and if it wants to, and that self same dog is capable above all others of decapitating your child simply because it sates its genetic heritage in doing that. Being able to say 'no' to a dog that is pushed upon you is absolutely vital. YOU are doing the Shelter a favor, not vice versa. Wrongly done, whether through misidentification or through pressure or both, that favor could cost you your LIFE or lend you a lifetime of guilt and horror if that Death-gene loaded gun of a dog takes the face or life of your child.

Calling Shelters misleading liars is about right, and emotional kidnappers of the unwary and the unready; they should indeed pay for it.

OpenID joelande  |  5/04/2016 5:33 PM  |  Flag  
I can tell you from personal experience that many animal shelters employees are indeed taught to lie, coached on what lies to tell, and encouraged to do it.

This has increased hugely since the increase in No Kill shelters and pit bull lobbying.

The sad thing is that many of the workers and volunteers manipulated in this way are young girls or young women who have kind hearts, and don't seem to understand they are being used to do bad things to all involved, including the dogs

The boards of directors and managers of these shelters need to face full responsibility for what they are doing and be charged with consumer fraud.

I do want to stress that there still are many shelters and rescue groups that do not do this and do not deal in fighting breeds, and they should be sought out and supported, as those dogs deserve wonderful homes and the people running those kinds of shelters care about both people and animals.

Blogger Packhorse  |  5/07/2016 5:59 PM  |  Flag  
Today I saw a person wearing a t-shirt that said, "Ignore the Bull****. Adopt a Pit Today."
How lovely that these folks must think innocent kids like this are "bull****."

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