Monday, April 20, 2015

Donate to
Please donate to support our work is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt public charity organization. Learn more »

posted by   |  permalink  |  10 comments  | email  |icon blog rss  |icon comment rss 


Blogger Animal Uncontrol  |  4/20/2015 6:34 AM  |  Flag  
Thanks for this article, as I'd never been able to articulate this "ban on bans" too well.

I always make the point, love these dogs or hate them, preemption is totally hypocritical: Towns and cities often zone out barnyard animals... arguably for health and safety reasons but the county may not regulate my back yard full of pit bulls? What makes dogs so vastly superior to all other mammals?

Interesting how this crosses known political boundaries: Red states Texas, OK and Utah have Preemption, but so do blue NJ, NY, CT and MA. No Preemption in red KY, AZ and GA and also no preemption in blue WA, OR, VT and MD.

Blogger Your Quiet Neighbor  |  4/20/2015 9:39 AM  |  Flag  
The takeaway: Do NOT donate to Best Friends. They are NOT our friends!

OpenID joelande  |  4/20/2015 10:42 PM  |  Flag  
"Fighting dog advocates" is a very apt and appropriate description of what Best Friends Animal Society is.

Even if they do not care about the human or animal victims of fighting breeds, they most certainly cannot claim to care about the fighting breeds themselves.

Things are worse than ever for pit bulls!

Thanks in part to their efforts, the only ones in this mess that have prospered and proliferated have been pit bull breeders and dog fighters, with the parasitic interests of hoarders and dealers that abuse the dogs in order to profit on the side.

When will Best Friends put aside their egos and admit that they've gone down a terribly destructive path that is failing for all but the exploiters of these breeds?

Blogger S.K.Y.  |  4/21/2015 12:39 AM  |  Flag  
This is an excellent article with very useful graphs that I plan to send people (incl. legislators) to in the future. I'm happy to live in one of the states without a preemption law, and am hoping to keep it that way.

Blogger Colleen Lynn  |  4/21/2015 11:36 AM  |  Flag  
Excellent SKY!

Blogger Jen  |  4/21/2015 2:15 PM  |  Flag  
Thank you for putting this together. I live in PA and would like to get our preemption removed. I think it was enacted in the late 70s but am not sure. It has definitely been around for awhile. These charts are so helpful.

I think I will give them to my aunt whose daughter has 2 pit bulls and is constantly spouting the they'll lick your face off nonsense. If only she knew how true that really is!

Your Quiet Neighbor: I won't donate to ANY animal charity that deals with dogs. They have all become pit pushers, IMHO. This includes those $1 donations at PetSmart.

Blogger Colleen Lynn  |  4/21/2015 9:27 PM  |  Flag  
Thank you for writing in from Pennsylvania! Your state enacted a preemption law barring local governments from enacting breed-specific ordinances during Wave I. A lessor known fact is that at the same time, Pennsylvania enacted the first insurance preemption law too. Insurers could not refuse coverage of a specific dog breed. Below is the 1982 Act 225, Section 507-A was added in 1990.

Because of your comment, we looked more closely at Section 507-A. We had initially believed the whole portion was enacted in 1982. That is not the case, if you read the very last line! We have made an update to this post accordingly.

Blogger Jen  |  5/08/2015 8:57 AM  |  Flag  
Thank you for the link to the law. I actually was aware of the insurance preemption. I'm not sure how I feel about that. Not being able to get insurance can act as a stick for some people to get rid of a dangerous dog, but for others they would otherwise just go without insurance. It's good and bad.

Blogger Jen  |  5/08/2015 9:04 AM  |  Flag  
I called my local State representative and asked to speak with her about repealing the preemption. I'll let you know how it goes.

Blogger julieveggie  |  10/27/2015 12:12 PM  |  Flag  
The reason 19 states were able to pass public hazard state-wide anti-BSL laws is because the general public was unaware that these types of laws were even happening. Now there is a growing voice who have become aware to help stop these type of public safety hazard bills.

Post a Comment »