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21 thoughts on “Delta Passenger Repeatedly Attacked in the Face by a Large "Support" Dog Sues Airline and the Owner of the Dog

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  1. GOOD! I hope he wins a boatload. This is the only real solution I see to the pit bull mauling problem- a lawsuit, EVERY time will take the fun out of these shit dogs.

    • Yup, it’s BSL, all right.

      The letters stand for Breed-Specific LITIGATION.

  2. I am hoping he wins a ton of money from Delta and from the dog owner (who we know won’t pay a dime). Despite Delta and United banning pits and their mixes (like this fake PSA), these dogs continue to make it onto flights. My husband flyies a lot for work and at least once a month one is on his flight and he sends me photos.

    Colleen, it would be nice if there was a drop box where we could drop these photos with flight information (thank you digital photography for having all the details embedded) so that plaintiff attorneys could accumulate them for their cases to show persistent disregard for the airlines” own policies.

  3. Good! I hope that lawsuits become so common that the owners of these nasty dogs realize that they are a walking lawsuit, they will keep them home where they belong. Better yet, I wonder how many of the ” emotionally fragile therefore I have to have my pibble”miraculously are cured of their anxiety.

  4. Service animals don’t attack. This owner needs to be ratted out and the fact that he falsely registered this dog as a service animal needs to be punished. I’d like to see him receive jail time. I hope his dog was taken and put down.

  5. Dear Marlin Jackson,
    VICTIMS, both living and deceased, of dangerous dog breed attacks are 110% behind you. Make those irresponsible naive and psychopathic (think “pit ‘n run”) dangerous dog owners pay… HUGE!!!
    Aside, (and rhetorical): I wonder how Mundy’s psyche is doing, following his poor choice in PSA dog?

  6. I don’t think that certificates declaring that the dog is “trained” mean much. Being in an airplane is a very different situation than what most dogs are exposed to in normal training classes.

    Real service dogs (like guide dogs for the blind) truly are exposed to many different situations, including crowded public areas. So-called “emotional support dogs” do not need to undergo such rigorous training and hence, sometimes bite or attack people (often they are just random dogs pulled out of shelters.).

    What are psychiatric support dogs actually trained to do anyway? It’s clear what guide dogs do, and I do understand that pets can have a calming effect on some people. However, if someone starts having a a psychotic episode in an airplane, what on Earth is a dog going to do about it? I would think an actual person would be a more appropriate support for a severely mentally ill person who is flying and may have major problems on the airplane.

    • Attestations (for ESAs, PSAs) are the only thing the airlines can do — they are restricted from asking for any type of training certification.

      • Ultimately, the real problem is the ADA service animal law itself. I can’t imagine someone from the breeders industry hasn’t greased someone’s palms there to have drafted such horrible legislation.

    • There are no standards for service dog training. I could pick up a dog from the pound and take it to Walmart. If they ask “Is it a service dog” I could say yes. I they asked what task does it perform I could say anything, I could say it detects seizures,it helps me get up off the floor, I use it for ballance, it keeps me warm, anything. If you answer Yes it is a service dog and make up a task it does, it by law is a service dog. The store is not allowed to ask you to have the dog demonstrate the task or show any proof of training or even that the dog has its shots. It is totally the honor system.

      Most Seeing Eye dogs are well trained, they have to be to do their job. The types of service dogs have expanded exponentially in recent years. Owner trained dogs used to be rare, now they are commonplace. Sadly the honor system is wide open for abuse.

  7. I am intrigued with the idea of making the doctors that approve this nonsense share some of the responsibility. I never thought about this before, but they really should.

    • If you go to this link, you can freely download what are (we believe to be) the only two peer-reviewed studies about this issue. The researchers provided these materials to the DOT during public comments last year.

      https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=DOT-OST-2018-0068-0686

      The Certification of Emotional Support Animals: Differences Between Clinical and Forensic Mental Health Practitioners (Cassandra L. Boness and Jeffrey N. Younggren, 2017)

      Examining Emotional Support Animals and Role Conflicts in Professional Psychology (Younggren, J. N., Boisvert, J. A., & Boness, 2016)

      “Therefore, ESA recommendations are more than just a psychological opinion. Recommendations are formal disability determinations under the law and they imply that the individual is disabled by their psychological condition and therefore requires the presence of the ESA to remain psychologically stable (Younggren, Boisvert, & Boness, 2016). The fact that half of the clinicians in the sample have made one or more ESA recommendation again demonstrates that they do not understand that this is a formal disability determination that arguably should be handled by a forensic practitioner who is familiar with the procedures of a disability determination. Further, the fact that 64.3% of the sample reported they feel qualified to make an ESA recommendation (see Table 3) is alarming given the lack of clear standards for making such an evaluation.”

  8. As both a professional dog trainer AND someone who has fear of flying, I take a benzodiazepine when I fly, and because of this, I would literally be incapable of controlling any dog on a plane, despite many decades as a trainer. Personally I would like for the law to allow service dogs only, not emotional support animals on planes and I am in favor of a federal law banning certain breeds from being service dogs and ES dogs, because it is totally unrealistic to expect a disabled person to be able to control breeds such as APBTs, Cane Corsos, etc. which are prone to aggression towards other pets and people.

  9. No matter what amount of money Jackson gets, he’s always going to have some PTSD from this incident. Most likely, for the rest of his life, he’s going to feel anxious being around dogs. Who wouldn’t be?

  10. I am constantly seeing people ISO for pitbulls to be their ESA on FB. Its ridiculous and eye roll worthy.

  11. Isn’t it amazing how all these ” mentally unstable ” ppl with their ” emotional support ” creatures have countless YouTube videos of themselves running around in Disney, Malls, Airports, shopping centers, restaurants etc, etc.
    seem totally fine, snickering and laughing, then get into confrontations with people who ” question ” the legitimacy of their PETS , because that is exactly what they are…PETS 😡
    In Europe the only time you see a service dog is with someone who is blind or in a wheelchair!!! FACT !

  12. Today’s news:

    Captain Sully supports standards for emotional support animals. “Too many dogs on jetliners that do not belong there”

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