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13 thoughts on “2019 Dog Bite Fatality: Woman in Anza Pit Bull Attack Dies of Injuries After Weeks of Being on Life Support

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  1. When are the pity party people going to start their campaign to save these maulers? I find it such a dichotomy how the photos made public of these three dogs look sad, guilty, and lonely, while one is covered in human blood and we know what they did.

    • Awwww, look at the poor sad widdle pibble wibbles. Please rescue them because they want to go home. They just want to be lo-o-oved.

      That is, before they, ahem, lick you to death.

  2. If she dies the owner of the dogs should be charged with manslaughter. There is no excuse for this level of negligence with a vicious animal.

      • Colleen, I am never going to understand this logic. We are not talking about a bite here. How is it that people can own highly potentially dangerous animals, oops they get loose, and they tear another being apart, and the owner faces little to no consequences?!?!? People have been scalped, eviscerated, lost limb and life, defaced, degloved, have had large blood vessels ripped out of their bodies, tracheas ripped out, and more! These dogs (and some other breeds) are inherently dangerous and the owners face little consequences for these extreme injuries.

        • It’s a travesty — a real travesty. And it does not have to be this way. It’s not this way in the UK. We could easily have felony penalties for loose dog attacks. You’re guilty/negligent because they got loose and seriously injured or killed someone. The End.

  3. I am glad you post the photos of the dogs as well as the victims. These pictures look like a thousand others of pits being offered at shelters all across the country. These animals appear calm, even friendly.

    But this is exactly what you can expect with breeds designed to go from zero to rampage and back again in a matter of moments. It hits home that you cannot judge which ones are going to turn just by looking at them. You just cannot know, and that’s what makes them such a risk.

  4. It’s getting very strange. I live in L.A., in an upscale neighborhood, but we are seeing them here now. Two were running loose in the neighborhood, apparently stalking a woman walking her dog. I picked her up and
    called the police,who came racing up. Unable to find the dogs, but police went on and on about how dangerous they are.

    That’s when I found this website. Recently, a neighbor with his walked by…I stayed in my car and said softly, “I hate those dogs….” Neighbor heard me and really yelled. Said I was a terrible person… ?

    • It’s the same in my neighborhood. I’m not in L.A., but in an upper middle class neighborhood on the east coast, and I see more and more of these landsharks. And it’s not just hipsters who think they’re doing some virtuous act by adopting a “poor misunderstood pibble”. These are older, retirement age folks walking dogs that can destroy them with little effort. I keep thinking it’s only a matter of time before one of those rescue dogs become a rescue call.

  5. If you cannot defend yourself from a dog, then don’t adopt it. You wouldn’t adopt a bear would you? If your 50 or small and cannot outfight it, don’t get something too strong or big for you to handle. Adopt a poodle instead and then the animal organizations destroy the vicious mongrels like they should of in the first place.

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