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15 thoughts on “2019 Dog Bite Fatality: Owner of Doberman Pinscher Show Dogs Found Dead with Multiple Dog Bite Injuries

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  1. Generally I get annoyed when the pit bull people create conspiracy theories and alternate theories involving the attacks by pit bulls. But I actually have to question this attack. Where her dogs found inside because there was a dog door? I would hope they do bite analysis, especially if they find there’s no way the dogs could go freely inside and outside of the house. We have seen it before, pitbull’s breaking into homes and scaling fences to attack and then leaving afterwords. Knowing she had show dogs has a very high correlation that these dogs were not fixed so nce fixed dogs cannot compete. Her dogs would serve as a lure to a pit bull.

  2. Agree with Christy. Swab for other DNA on the victim, especially If no human blood indoors.

  3. Going back to 1984, there was the Old English Sheepdog show dog that killed a woman. Daralin Talisman’s King Boots killed his owner’s 87yo mother. That was a spectacle – the owners wanted the dog back and fought for it in an early example of baffling killer-dog owner behavior.

    AKC does allow sterilized (fixed) dogs to compete in performance events such as agility. If she was involved primarily in that, she might have had the dogs spayed/neutered. The AKC people routinely sterilize their dogs after their conformation/breeding days are over, and some AKC people quit competing in conformation and focus on agility, rally, etc. If she’d been excommunicated from her local AKC group for stealing from them, she probably wasn’t breeding.

    • Aren’t fixed male dogs allowed if they have those implants, you know, the silicone balls that get inserted in the dog’s scrotum to make them look unaltered? Or if they have that neuter operation that is like a vasectomy, not a full testicle-removal neuter?

      I thought I read that not too long ago, but I could be wrong; I don’t know much at all about the world of show dogs. (And it really doesn’t matter, I’m just curious more than anything else.)

  4. I’m confused. One person on a different website said the attacking Doberman was a rescue dog. Was there a dog door? If not, was there evidence inside the house that an attack occurred? Human blood? Torn clothes? Was she inside and managed to get outside before she died? Or did someone else’s dogs kill her in her own backyard? Have the Dobermans been DNA’d? Was dog saliva detected on the body and DNA collected and compared with the Doberman’s DNA? Is there any possibility that someone with a grievance toward her could have intentionally turned loose a killer dog in her backyard? Did a killer dog on its own get into her backyard? Was her backyard fenced? So many questions!

  5. This does not, yet, make sense. If the current cause of death was sharp force injuries that does not sound like a fatal dog mauling. Dogs located inside does not sound like a fatal dog mailing. Dobes, in 2019, are not at all like the unstable, sharp-shy dogs of the 70s. Today they are more likely to be sensitive, shy and reserved than aggressive. I would bet my car that the bites on her body do not match her Dobes but rather, another dog’s.

  6. The breeder/show dog fatality cases are very often laden in conspiracy. The coroner has made a preliminary finding and the manner of death was ruled “accident” not “homicide.” The idea that a person brought dogs on the property, ordered them to attack and kill Richman then left the property is unrealistic. It is also unknown if she was training these dogs in protection work or if either of the dogs had protection work in their background. Finally, the manner of death was not “suicide” either.

    Regarding “sharp force injuries”

    — Jaelah Smith, mauled by a pit bull, died of “sharp force injuries to a major vein and artery.”

    — Hunter Bragg, mauled by a pit bull, died of “blunt and sharp force injuries of head and neck.”

    — Pamela Devitt, mauled by a pack of pit bulls, had “200 puncture wounds and sharp force trauma across her body.”

    — The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences (same lab as Richman) said that Christina Burleson, mauled by a pack of pit bulls, died of “blunt and sharp force injuries.”

    — Virgil Cantrell, mauled by a pit bull, died of “massive sharp force injuries which included damaging arteries and veins as well as fracturing (Cantrell’s) right jaw and” the right side of the carvical vertabra.”

    — The Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office (same lab as Richman) said that Pedro Rios Jr., mauled by a pit bull, died of “blunt and sharp force injuries.”

    — Fannie Pharms, mauled by pit bulls and a rottweiler, died of “multiple sharp injuries” (Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office, same lab as Richman)

    — Lorinze Reddings, mauled by his pit bull, died of “sharp force and crushing injury to the neck.” Dr. Jane Turner, deputy medical examiner for St. Charles County, said the “sharp force was caused by dog teeth.”

  7. We just acquired our third in a row dobe last year. We are old and she will be our last. I like to think we are different than pitbull enthusiasts because there’s not a chance on earth i want to see this covered up. I have questions as do many of you. It is peculiar that she was found outside and the dogs inside but im going to assume sloppy repor for the time being.

  8. I love the Doberman breed. Hopefully DNA is being analyzed to confirm it was her dogs. People have the right to know the truth. Her dog looked gentle and kind in the photo. I would have never picked it out of a lineup as a future killer. I wish we did know what triggered each brutal attack so those triggers could be avoided in the future. I have a big, non aggressive type dog and after learning about dangerous dogs, I view my own dogs differently. If this professional handler dogs mauled her, I guess mine could turn on me. I’ll be waiting for future updates on this case.

    • I think we can expect this one to take awhile — the final autopsy report. We’ll be checking in on it every few weeks. But the determination could take up to 6 months.

      • Why will it take so long? They have already determined her death was not due to wild animals in that area. People are very interested in knowing if it truly was her dogs that killed her.

  9. I wish they would say if the house had a doggie door or had any open doors or windows.

    If the Dobermans has access to the yard and the house, yea they probably did it. If they were secured in the house, it would look like it was other dogs.

  10. The Doberman Talk board shared information (3rd, 4th, 5th hand) that Elaine’s home had a one way dog door. This is to control exit access. So, the dogs could not exit the home, but could enter the home. The way it was described to us was to restrict access to dogs going outdoors when having “multiple male dogs.” While she did not have multiple male dogs at the time of her death, certainly she could have during her tenure of show ring and agility training years. The fact that police did not mention “any access” point into (or out of) the home for the dogs has fueled a wealth of unnecessary speculation. There either was or was not an access point — information that should have been included by police in initial reports.

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