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Blogger Cindy Ballard  |  7/25/2014 1:48 PM  |  Flag  
This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger RSM  |  7/25/2014 2:07 PM  |  Flag  
Why has Ac failed so badly, all over the nation? How many stories of fatalities, just this year, were dogs that have a history of attack?

And WHY do we allow killer breeds to be pets? This is nuts. Pits are bad enough, but Cano Corso's are even worse because of their size. There aren't so many CC deaths simply because there are fewer of them. If there were millions, I cannot imagine the death toll.

BSL NOW, and BSL must cover all the GRIPPING DOGS, fighting breeds, and their mixes.

Blogger Your Quiet Neighbor  |  7/25/2014 7:11 PM  |  Flag  
Animal control is an oxymoron that's run by morons.

OpenID maultalk  |  7/25/2014 8:19 PM  |  Flag  
Gotta wonder if the dog's owner pulls weight in the town. Corsos are not inexpensive dogs nor is defending yourself against two separate lawsuits with a third on the way. He should be named in the future. Would not surprise me if a family member/relative is a judge or something along that line.

Blogger Farmer Jane  |  7/26/2014 7:55 AM  |  Flag  
I hope authorities look into the hawk thing. Most hawks are federally protected and require special licensing to keep. In my state (FL),
if you are found to have a bird of
prey illegally they'll go after you. The punishment is a lot worse than owning a dog that kills someone.They fall under the protection of Fl. Fish and Wildlife who are pretty zealous in prosecuting people. Unlike animal control who think that dogs are like people, only not responsible for their actions, and just doing what dogs do.
My heart goes out to this victim and his family. The last minutes of his life were a nightmare. No one deserves to die like this because of someone's choice of a pet.

Blogger B Cazz  |  7/26/2014 8:55 AM  |  Flag  
This is fantastic:
'"the apparent product of aggressive animals that have killed a human being," the complaint said. "Complainant believes ... that the puppies are products of the adult Cane Corso’s resulting in human death and they’re [sic] blood line cannot be reasonably believed to be safe for society," the complaint says"

I hope this catches on-
Cull the Man Biters, Cull the whole damned (blood)line!

OpenID maultalk  |  7/26/2014 9:45 AM  |  Flag  
Here are a few links before they go offline: The actual puppy sales link with photos and registration papers:
Corso puppies - Sebastian or Vali

Translation "My hawk has a nice rabbit for lunch."
Sebastiano Quagliata and his falcon

Blogger Miss Margo  |  7/27/2014 1:41 PM  |  Flag  
Farmer Jane, I was thinking the exact same thing about the hawk. You have to be licensed to own and fly a raptor. It takes years of diligent study to get that license, and, as I'm sure you know, you have to pass home inspections and demonstrate that you have a suitable home for the raptor. Your mentor at the local falconry club also has to vouch for you.

Somehow I do not think this fucktard has a permit for the hawk. I dunno, responsibility just doesn't seem like his strong suit.

What an awful, awful way for Mr. Sytsma to die.

Blogger Jeff Borchardt  |  7/28/2014 3:37 PM  |  Flag  
Daxton’s Friends serves as a resource for legislators and legislation bodies addressing canine related public safety. Our goal is to support the implementation of tools to ensure healthy canine ownership and public safety.

If Daxton’s Friends is provided substantial evidence that we have shared incorrect information, we will correct or retract statements. We welcome feedback and invite you to share your thoughts about our organization. Please e-mail us at

The Cane Corso originates from Italy and is a descendant of the Roman Molossian, likely mixed with the ancient British Mastiffs (pugnaces Britanniae). The latter were used for bear- and bull-baiting, and by British soldiers in war as early as 55 B.C. The Romans were so impressed by the aggression of the English mastiffs that they considered them superior to their own Roman war dogs.

Both the Roman and the English ancestors of the Cane Corso were bred for hunting large game, to battle in warfare, as a guard dog, and for arena blood ‘sports’. As a hunting dog they were selectively bred to attack game such as wild boar or cougars. One ancient writer described them thus: “not speedy but impetuous, a fighter of great courage and incredible strength, to be employed against bulls and wild boar, undaunted even when confronted with a lion.” They were called canis pugnaces because of their willingness to fight to the death and their function of attacking wild animals. As guard dogs, they were always chained and never had the run of the property, because they were too dangerous. In the arena, they were used in spectacles that involved three or four of these pugnaces / molosser types mauling a bear, a horse or a lion to death slowly, though until the fall of the Roman Empire the victim could also be human (a slave or prisoner)2,3

Cane Corsos are, as adults, very calm house companions. They like to be near their family, but they aren’t fond of cuddling nor demanding about attention. They can react to many things as if they perceive a threat. It is essential to get a puppy from a breeder that keeps the pups inside the home from birth, so they are socialized from birth to understand what is and isn’t a threat in normal household activities. The same intense exposure is necessary to out-of-home things such as pedestrians on the street, people getting in and out of cars, people coming in and out of shops, so the dog will understand that these things are normal and also no threat. That said, there is no amount of socialization that will make the Cane Corso friendly to strangers inside or outside the home. They may do well with some strangers if properly introduced, but the owner must be present at all times for close supervision.

In North America, from 1982-2013, Cane Corsos have seriously attacked 18 humans that resulted in 11 maimings and 1 fatality. In addition, a Cane Corso/Pit Bull mix attacked 1 person that resulted in a fatality.

Click here to read the complete Cane Corso breed description:

Blogger Farmer Jane  |  7/29/2014 8:56 AM  |  Flag  
I didn't see in the article whether or not the dogs and their puppies have actually been put down. Do we know?

Blogger Colleen Lynn  |  7/29/2014 9:03 AM  |  Flag  
The two attackers will likely be put down shortly -- owners have already agreed to put down. It could be a long time before the puppies and other dogs seized in the house are put down; depends upon if the owners fight it or if the dogs are needed for evidence...

Blogger Farmer Jane  |  7/29/2014 10:04 AM  |  Flag  
Thanks. I'm worried about the killer dog fan clubs that try to save these monsters. They should raise their heads any minute because, well, they are just puppies after all. What harm can they do. I wonder how many other litters have been sold?

Blogger Miss Margo  |  7/29/2014 10:31 AM  |  Flag  
But, but, are always culled!

The owner of these dogs should be sued into bankruptcy (though I doubt he has any meaningful wealth) and then put in prison.

The sad thing about cases like this is that justice will always be ephemeral; unattainable. Nothing can bring the victim back or assuage his terrible suffering. Nothing can adequately punish the awful person who allowed--indeed, engineered--the killing.

Blogger Colleen Lynn  |  7/29/2014 9:39 PM  |  Flag  
Farmer Jane, a hearing for the dogs is scheduled for Friday ("A hearing is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Friday in a Lapeer County courtroom over the fate of the dogs, as well as several others the individual owns at their property") -- It really depends upon the owners. It would be in their best interest to hand them over and blame the attack on "bad breeding," which would minimize their role of being negligent, irresponsible owners. If they fight to "save" the puppies so that they have a chance of being brought up by "good" owners… This makes the current owners look bad. However, it would not surprise me if these owners put forth a deal to "send them to a sanctuary" out-of-state for the rest of their natural lives (with no proof of sterilization beforehand, no clue where the dogs will be 6 months after being shipped out of state, no oversight whatsoever! Just put the dozen or so puppies -- each worth $1,000 --- onto a plane and call it good!)

Blogger Ch Carroll  |  7/31/2014 3:25 AM  |  Flag  
The owners are now reported to be in the country illegally. The woman is said to have bribed an official to reverse the decision to deny her asylum, and the man reportedly came in on a tourist visa and never left.

Someone in my building has a cane corso. It was young, maybe 3/4 grown, when I met it and was an unusually beautiful and seemingly good natured dog. It certainly didn't impress me as something that would eat people.

Blogger Farmer Jane  |  8/01/2014 7:50 AM  |  Flag  
It's good to see them given charges that actually seem to fit the crime. As I've mentioned before, I live just up the road from the home where Roy McSweeney was mauled and killed in 2011. This still haunts me. I don't know if the owners were ever convicted, but they were indicted.

"Deanna Blitch was charged with two counts of attack by a dangerous dog, giving false information to a deputy and resisting arrest without violence. Her son William, who goes by his middle name Braxton, was charged with giving false information and resisting arrest without violence.

The attack charges are first-degree misdemeanors and the others are second-degree. The Putnam grand jury indicted the two Monday. The mother and son were arrested Tuesday and were released on $3,000 and $2,000 bail, respectively."

I find this situation to be horribly similar to the attack on Mr. McSweeney. Yet, the owners were only charged with misdemeanors. I hope they nail these two to the wall and use them to set an example for future dog owners.

Blogger Farmer Jane  |  8/01/2014 7:56 AM  |  Flag  
Further research via Google tells me that the dog owner in the McSweeney killing got 90 days, some community service and a few piddly fines.

I know she still lives close by because she was involved with a domestic altercation recently where the County Sheriff was called. She should have been sent away for life.

Blogger Colleen Lynn  |  8/01/2014 1:26 PM  |  Flag  
Bail was set at half a million each. The hearing to put the dogs down was cancelled today. Please send in updates in your comments. I will be traveling for a few days.

"Bail was set at $500,000 each for Sebastiano Quagliata, 45, and Valbona Lucaj, 44. The couple were arrested Thursday ... The Cane Corsos that killed Sytsma have reportedly been involved in other attacks. A hearing on putting the dogs down, scheduled for Friday afternoon, was canceled."

Blogger Animal Uncontrol  |  8/01/2014 8:11 PM  |  Flag  
Nothing surprising about the criminal immigration status, visa fraud and the like. Violent, in your face doggers are the epitome of the bottom of the barrel scumbag. Yes, lets deport them... in body bags!

OpenID maultalk  |  8/03/2014 6:10 PM  |  Flag  
An update on the maul spawners here. By all means, let Lapeer AC make the determination, did such a great job on the parents!

"The puppies will be given to an appropriate shelter, based on the determination of the Lapeer County Animal Control...If a shelter for the puppies cannot be found, the prosecutor’s office can come back to the court. “We have the right to repetition in 60 days,” he said. The puppies will be sterilized and anyone who takes them from any shelter would have to be warned of the history of their family...animal control is attempting to contact other litters from breeds that Quagliata and Lucaj may have sold..."

OpenID maultalk  |  8/03/2014 6:15 PM  |  Flag  
And there is more! Defense is claiming his clients could benefit from lack of action by AC!

Blogger PutMeInCharge4OneDay  |  8/04/2014 10:23 PM  |  Flag  
"The puppies will be sterilized and anyone who takes them from any shelter would have to be warned of the history of their family..."

What about any one forced to live in the same neighborhood as these dogs. I don't suppose they will get the benefit of that warning.

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