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13 thoughts on “Working at an Open Intake Shelter: Deliberate Breed Mislabeling, Aggressive Dogs and Unprepared Adopters

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  1. This is absolute insanity. This is something that should be national news. People should be outraged at what is going on in this shelter system. I see shelter run commercials everyday talking about the dog abuse and puppy mill hooplah. Okay whatever. But WHERE are the commercials exposing these corrupt shelters??? Where is the media to report on these shelters pushing pit bulls onto the public that end up mauling and killing? So many people have already spoken out and the evidence is clear as day. This needs to be public news NOW.

    • Look first directly at the Humane Society. They intentionally mis-label dog breeds all the time, or use code words/phrases, like “just needs to decompress” or “dog selective.”

      Smaller rescues are just as bad. And they are relentlessly bullied by pit advocates. One small poodle rescue was viciously bullied and threatened with death because they refuse to adopt 3-4 lb poodles to owners of large dogs, especially pits. Tia Torres of Pitbulls and Parolees literally had to come to that rescue’s defense!

      I will never rescue from an organization that is not breed specific and that has a long list of requirements. They care.

  2. This sort of aggressive bullying is lamentably effective, and leads to yet more worthless pit bulls clogging the system: “[S]upervisors were afraid of the online community of pit bull advocates that watched our online databases like hawks and would call/email/bombard the Facebook page with angry comments if they believed a pit-type dog was in danger of being euthanized due to behavior.”

    • Yes, and caving to bullying only guarantees more bullying.

      It’s bad enough that pit bull advocates who resort to bullying have, effectively, found a way to steer shelter policies via that bullying.

      It’s worse when the policies they are manipulating result in harm to humans and animals. This is a case where “the blood for this is on your hands” really is true. Unfortunately, the bullies are sociopaths who have neither empathy nor shame. Why are we letting them control decisions that affect public safety?

    • Exactly, Quiet.

      That’s why all the language is tainted. “Rescuing/adopting”.

      If I purchase a car that blows up on the road two weeks later, I can sue the person who sold it and the manufacturer because I *own* it.

      You can’t sue a foster agency if you adopt a troubled child who chases your sister around with a knife because the child is “adopted”. The child is considered a family member. The most you can hope for, is to send the child back or pay for therapy and pray the situation, improves.

      The use of language is very deliberate.

  3. “…hapless adopters” The definition of hapless: without luck, unfortunate. What a way to be defined as that person who leaves a shelter with a potential monster. I’m reminded of the hapless woman who brought home a pit bull that killed her elderly mother the same day. I always knew there was something ominous about this breed, but didn’t find the evidence until I found this website. So, yes, education is key for the hapless who have been sold a bill of goods. And, yes, the media needs to step up and expose this travesty. I’m not sure they ever will. They continue to call the mauling and killing “accidents.” Their business is ratings, and cute dog and cat stories bring in the lots of viewers. Pit bull attack stories bring in venom and threats.

    • “I was sold a dog that murdered my grandma by an organisation that knew it mauled at least two people before they sold it to me then deliberately covered-up that information when making the sales pitch”

      Kinda takes the spin out of it

  4. If a breeder lied about the breeds of dogs within their breeding program, people would be trying to get them shut down and rightfully so. But shelters on the other hand are encouraged to lie about the dogs they put on the floor; breed, temperament, history, everything so long as they can keep their save rate. This is yet another reason I will never support animal shelters. I won’t be giving money to people who are willing putting people in danger because they care more about their save numbers and the opinions of overly vocal pit nutters than keeping the public safe.

  5. Thank you for this. I watch Philly’s ACCT shelter via Facebook, and they are routinely rehoming and transferring to rescue groups dogs who bite and attack humans, who bite and attack and kill dogs and cats. It is no longer remarkable or surprising – every single time I look at their volunteer pages, their “Pen Pal” page, or see a rescue group bragging about their Philly save, there it is, buried in the dog’s original assessment and history. At least they are still releasing that information online. Many shelters, including NYC’s ACC, are no longer placing any information online beyond the usual marketing blurbs about how every dog is ‘sweet’ and ‘slow to warm up but once she does she’s your friend for life.’

    Example of ACCT’s recent dog-killer grads: ACCT recently released an older “shepherd mix” (very clearly a tan pit bull mix with atypical rough coat and some dark points) named Shy to a western PA shelter. The dog had been surrendered for attacking 2 cats and a dog in the family within 2 weeks, and biting the owner’s grandchild out of nowhere. Shy was adopted out, killed a dog, and returned. ACCT then allowed a rescue group to take it; they adopted it out to a woman with a small child. The adoption announcement on the western PA shelter’s FB page was commented on by volunteers who’d marketed Shy – they appeared to be laughing at the idea of that dog living with a little girl.

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