dog bite statistics

Friday, January 25, 2013



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4 comments:

Blogger Your Quiet Neighbor  |  1/25/2013 5:19 PM  |  Flag  
Ever so slowly, the tide is turning in our direction.

Blogger Decatur AL livin nt to 4 pits  |  1/25/2013 10:52 PM  |  Flag  
What a warm feeling to know some good has been achieved...2 steps backward, then 1 step forward...

Blogger Sputnik2009  |  1/26/2013 7:27 AM  |  Flag  
Thank heavens you're keeping track of all this and compiling the jurisprudence in a single, easy to find place. I do think the day will come when courts dismiss this kind of appeal out of hand because the issue has already been decided by so many courts.

Thank you!

OpenID e69172e0-702b-11e2-941d-000bcdcb5194  |  2/06/2013 1:07 AM  |  Flag  
Regarding those who fight against BSL legislation and the "punish the deed, not the breed" camp. I am involved in dog rescue and animal fostering, but refuse to foster pit bulls. You would not believe the flack I get from some fellow dog rescuers about this. Shelter staff try to push these dogs on volunteer foster parents, which leads a number of the latter to quit. I may be one of the defectors eventually.

When I foster a Basset Hound and he wants to sniff everything while he's out for a walk, even though he has never been used in tracking, I realize and accept that tracking is a genetic trait of scent hounds. Similarly, if I encounter a Border Collie who tries to herd people despite having no history a herding dog, I accept that this is a genetic trait as well. When a Greyhound needs to run regularly, I realize that's bred into them. Most people have the same realizations for these breeds--they recognize and accept certain traits as genetic. So why is it that pit bull apologists have problems admitting that this breed has a genetic predisposition to be aggressive?

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