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10 thoughts on “2018 Dog Bite Fatality: Man Dies, Woman Seriously Injured by Dog in Owensboro, Kentucky

  1. KaD — This is a dog bite fatality. We exclude proximate cause deaths. The coroner stated it in his finding. Any time you read "complicated by" or "complications due to" dog attack, that is sufficient. The dog bite injuries were "severe", the bite injuries and attack contributed to his death. Based on the dispatch calls and what the teenagers witnessed, this was a severe attack. It could have turned into a rampage attack too, if the dog had not been shot to death.

  2. But 'dog-aggression' is safe for people, right? That's what my friend the dog-fighter told me! Argh, I hate that DA lie that dogs can have dangerous and even lethal aggressive behaviors toward their own species but be safe with humans. That's just nuts. Dogs that act violently are dogs who are practicing violent behavior and arousing into states where they no longer control their own actions. That's inherently dangerous to anyone nearby, as the many cases where people get mauled or killed breaking up a pit attack show.

    "I don't care what kind of dog it was and I'm not going to say." You have to love the way it's become impossible to discuss a mauling without admitting the pit bull involvement, even if it's just by saying that you absolutely refuse to discuss the issue at all.

  3. We thought it was so interesting how the two mothers handled it so differently. They had the same shared experience of their children being near the scene (and witnessing part of the attack). One catered to "I'm not going to say" and the other screamed PIT BULL. They later go back and forth about their shared experience and do not mention this issue again.

  4. Pit bulls are known to be dog aggressive, the thought of having one around smaller dogs like dachshunds and beagles is just irresponsible. It's ridiculous in this day and age that people don't do the research on the history of fighting dogs and the descendants of those dogs (now often being dumped in the shelters because their owners have found them to be dangerous and/or unmanageable). Besides the genetic issues with the breed, the fact is if any dog is attacking other family pets, there are serious behavioral issues with that dog that shouldn't be ignored or minimized.

  5. This weekend I went to the local animal shelter to drop off donations. In the large dog are there were about 45 dogs and about 3 were breeds other than pits. The small dog area had mostly toys but they actually stuck two smaller pits in those kennels. I read many of the cards on the cages and there were at least 5 that were abdopted out and brought back for not getting along with another dog or a family member. One even said for fighting and the dog had two large, fresh, pink, hairless scars on its head. I was surprised that the shelter had comments this honest on the cards. As mentioned by other posters, dogs that are dog aggressive are never safe. When a fight breaks out, it is a reflex of the owner to try to stop it and getting in the middle can be a death sentence.

    I really wish there was a shelter near me that did not cater to these dogs (because that is what they are doing and that is where they are spending most of their resources).

    As far as this latest death, I am not surprised. I am relieved that it was the adult owner and not an innocent who was attacked.

  6. Christy D, if your local shelter is stuffed to the gills with pit bulls, stop donating to it. Just stop. And tell your friends to do the same.

    If these shelters start feeling the pinch in their pocketbooks, they'll change their tune real quick.

  7. You don't even need to make much of an effort to adopt non-pit shelter dogs; that's what the public is doing anyway, no matter how hard the pit lobby tries to convince them. I just did a search of my local animal shelter — there are pit bulls who have been there over a year. Meanwhile, the young non-pit bulls have all been at the shelter only a few days and will no doubt get adopted soon.

    There's a group here that attempts to rescue the most un-sought after shelter dogs (Austin Pets Alive — Colleen, you are probably familiar with them). They've got pit bulls, they've got chihuahuas, and they've got mixed breed dogs that are obviously part pit bull but they just give them a different name to help out their chances.

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