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9 thoughts on “2018 Dog Bite Fatality: 2-Year Old Girl Mauled to Death by Family Dog in Alvin, Texas

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  1. How common are Catahoula Leopard Dogs as a breed? I only heard about them a few years ago when they started showing up on Craigslist and PetFinder. I had to look them up online and to be honest, I didn’t see anything special about this breed to explain why they were proliferating in Pennsylvania. The link above describes the temperament of the dog in a way that would be a turn off and warning to any buyer. I don’t recall much info on their temperaments a few years ago when I first researched them on line. Looking at their coats and eye colors I suspect they are being bred with pits to produce designer coat and eye colors. Based on their shape and size, they could be bred with pits with minimal watering down of the pit bull look.

    Is anyone else seeing these in their shelters or in other rehousing sites?

    • Yes they very much are. The Bully breeders have used them to create merle, tri colors and more. The results produce many pit bull-mix merles that traditional pit bull owners would never own as the merle is a “fail” grade for an APBT. Bully breeders are all about breeding for special colors to up the sale price. Only two dog breeds can climb trees — pit bulls and Catahoulas, that should tell you something!

      • Colleen –
        I respectfully disagree. Border Collies can climb trees. They can climb out of 8′ kennels and I’ve even had one climb up the wall of a barn stall and peer over the edge at me and a group gathered for lunch in the aisle way. At that point others told me they’ve had their bcs climb out of stalls and walk along the rafters of the barn, just because they could. Thing is, bcs rarely do much damage when they climb and they’re easily called back.

        Many people claim that Catahoulas are a herding breed, but I haven’t seen anyone have much success with them.

    • I did further reading on this breed and I found that it is often classified as a ‘hound’ but that it is not, it is a ‘cur.’ I was not exactly sure what that was but it is apparently a mixed breed landrace local to an area. Basically a mutt that has a certain look in a geographic area. Many curs are now registered breeds. The description on Wikipedia makes it clear this is a dog that can be unsafe with children. I sure it is only a matter of time before someone (anyone) edits that description to something more benign and deceiving.

    • Yes. I am currently looking for a puppy in Wisconsin, and the shelters and ads are mostly pitbull, pitbull mixes, and “lab mixes” but I have also seen several leopard dogs, catahoula hounds, etc. And the sites have those tri color and merle pitbulls. I just want a normal puppy, but it seems very difficult to buy one that doesn’t cost around 1000.00 or you’re stuck with a pitbull often disguised as something else. I was considering a puppy that had pretty tan and black coloring that they said was a border collie shepherd mix, but I am suspicious because of the coloring and short coat. It is hard to tell when they’re puppies and online, but at best I’d say it has rottweiler coloring and I don’t know what else. It seems wrong to be afraid to take a chance on a puppy because you’re unsure if it will grow up to be a mutant mauler.

    • When northern shelter/rescue people discovered cur breeds (through the southern transport network), they began calling every pit bull mix that wasn’t wider than it was tall a ‘cur’ breed. Have a tan pit bull with a dark face? It’s a black mouth cur! White pit bull with freckling or patches? Catahoula! I think the ‘cur’ name didn’t help that much, and most of them around me seem to be going back to “hound mix” in an effort to evoke images of Snoopy.

      The curs in general may have been distinct from pit bulls/bulldogs originally, but there are two issues with that:

      1) They were created for and are still used for bloodsports. Breeds used for those purposes had to be extremely aggressive to survive.

      2) The curs tend to appeal to the same people as pit bulls, and end up mixed with them. At some point, you always have to suspect any breed that’s found favor with the pit bull breeders. Ever look at the Patterdales? They started out as offshoots of the Lakeland Terrier, which look like what a child would draw if you asked them to draw a terrier. The Patterdales, on the other hand, look like tiny, coal-black pit bulls.

  2. Yes. I am currently looking for a puppy in Wisconsin, and the shelters and ads are mostly pitbull, pitbull mixes, and “lab mixes” but I have also seen several leopard dogs, catahoula hounds, etc. And the sites have those tri color and merle pitbulls. I just want a normal puppy, but it seems very difficult to buy one that doesn’t cost around 1000.00 or you’re stuck with a pitbull often disguised as something else. I was considering a puppy that had pretty tan and black coloring that they said was a border collie shepherd mix, but I am suspicious because of the coloring and short coat. It is hard to tell when they’re puppies and online, but at best I’d say it has rottweiler coloring and I don’t know what else. It seems wrong to be afraid to take a chance on a puppy because you’re unsure if it will grow up to be a mutant mauler.

  3. “Nothing they could have done”- BS! They could have taken a known aggressive dog to the vet to get PTS instead of trying to pawn it off to be someone else’s problem. And their child would still be alive today.

  4. Anyone else wonder if a rescue was involved here?

    And Cindy, have you found a puppy? I found that it helps to Google specific breeds + your city. You don’t seem to have a specific breed in mind, but if you have a type, at least, looking them up can help. I found our puppy this way–he’s an absolutely fantastic GSD that we bought for a great price because the breeder isn’t a “champion” breeder, just someone who has some solid, papered GSDs who make great pets. Our boy is six months old now and an absolutely perfect GSD: smart as a whip, very loving and loyal, aloof but calm with strangers but very alert, gentle with everyone especially kids, and gorgeous. We paid only $600 for him, which is an amazing price if you know how much good solid GSDs can demand from breeders. It’s also worth going to your local pet stores and looking on their boards or asking other customers who have good dogs where they got them.

    Don’t give up, Cindy! There ARE good dogs still out there. Just don’t even bother with those lying rescues and pit pushers at Animal Control/HSUS. Our GSD is the first dog we’ve ever gotten from a breeder; I can’t in good conscience support the rescues etc. anymore, sadly, but have no regrets when our little man curls up next to me for a nap or insists on accompanying me outside (into our fenced yard, where I smoke cigs and read) so he can keep watch. 🙂

    (PS Yay! I can finally comment anonymously here!)

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