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OpenID maultalk  |  11/22/2014 1:23 PM  |  Flag  
Excellent call tribal president Bryan Brewer:

Brewer said he has heard no complaints about the roundups yet and is not concerned about a potential backlash from animal lovers. “I’m not concerned about that right now,” Brewer said. “I’m worried about the safety of our children.”

OpenID joelande  |  11/25/2014 6:47 AM  |  Flag  
The awful truth is that dog fighting is going on at some of these tribal lands, and some brave souls have tried to raise the topic in the past, in fear for their families lives, only to be ignored or silenced.

The latest victim, the lady who was attacked, clearly said there were 6 pit bulls that attacked her but oddly those pit bulls now can't be found.

It isn't too hard to guess what happened. Fighter dogs are worth money, and there is also a concern about exposure of fighting activities now when there is scrutiny.

Tribal lands also have been used for dog dumping, and poor tribes have been neglected by veterinarians who won't help them with spaying, and animal groups that are pusuing the No Kill agenda who don't want to face the reality that these packs of dogs need to be collected and some euthanized because there are no homes for them and they are dangerous.

There never should be dogs running loose anywhere because it results in human injury and death, and that is without even going into the disease and parasite issue.

No Kill supports animal abandonment, and affluent people in confortable and safe suburbs in places like California will condemn the tribes for collecting these dogs that also suffer from this abandonment, and put pressure on them to let the packs reform. No Kill just doesn't care about anything- human, animal, not a care. They care only about the agenda and domination.

Dogsbite has covered this issue before and I was interested to look back and see comments that are as true today as they were years ago

OpenID joelande  |  11/25/2014 6:53 AM  |  Flag  
I also have been reading discussions of the fact that some of the abandoned dogs forming these packs on tribal land were abandoned there by non-tribal people.

That is what happens when animal control in non-tribal cities and towns suddenly announce they are No Kill and slam the doors of the shelters shut, or have waiting lists, and stop picking up stray dogs. The animals have to go somewhere, and the tribes are one group of the victims that have had to deal with the aftermath of the No Kill disaster.

OpenID joelande  |  11/25/2014 7:06 AM  |  Flag  
I went to look for that attack, and I think this article describes that, and also goes into detail about other problems with dogs, especially aggressuive breeds, and tribal lands.

Blogger Colleen Lynn  |  11/25/2014 10:46 AM  |  Flag  
Depending upon the reservation, there may be an endless number of problems concerning abandoned and owned dogs allowed to roam. Of the attacks that occur on reservations (unless it is very severe or fatal), they are unlikely to reach the media. So it is hard to gauge how frequent attacks are. There are consistently issues with reservation dogs (whether they have an owner or not) that inflict damage off the reservation, then return. This usually sets up a near impossible jurisdiction issue for people and animals attacked by these dogs. Then there are the many reports of people dumping dogs on or near reservations as well. I think the problems with aggressive breeds vary significantly amongst reservations. Though it is difficult to track down tribal pet policies and ordinances, some certainly have developed policies to limit these dog breeds ( Dogfighting happens all over the country. It is extremely rare that we have heard of it ever occurring on reservations. If it were a problem, there are concerned animal welfare organizations (HSUS/HSVMA and outreach programs) that would be talking about it (

We have not examined the role of no-kill rescues with reservations, except for the fact that some claim to "rescue rez dogs" and find them "forever" homes.

Blogger April Gawboy Holman  |  1/08/2016 1:17 PM  |  Flag  
Why wasn't Braeden's Law banning Pit Bulls/other dangerous breeds on the rez actually carried out? There was at least one Pit Bull, maybe more involved in the latest killing of this little girl. Photos can be found on-line both loose and after some dogs were rounded up.

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