Friday, July 3, 2009


Donate to DogsBite.org
Please donate to support our work

DogsBite.org is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt public charity organization. Learn more »


posted by   |  permalink  |  29 comments  | email  |icon blog rss  |icon comment rss 

29 comments:

Blogger Honesty Helps  |  7/03/2009 5:21 PM  |  Flag  
Damn, you have an excellent point. I have already written an email to HSUS and asked them to explain this to me. I will be writing others as well. How many chimps in households in this country in comparison to how many pits? This really pisses me off.

Anonymous Trigger  |  7/03/2009 5:37 PM  |  Flag  
A 2005 HSUS Press Release:

"Animal welfare groups estimate there are 15,000 (primates) in private hands in the United States. According to the Captive Wild Animal Protection Coalition, nearly 100 people have been injured by primates in the past 10 years, including 29 children."
----
http://www.hsus.org/press_and_publications/press_releases/the_hsus_urges_swift_passage_of_bill_to_ban_dangerous_primates_as_pets.html

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/03/2009 6:20 PM  |  Flag  
Animal breeding, animal care and control, and prevention of cruelty to animals are long established state and local jurisdictions (not federal). The feds could prohibit interstate commerce in pit bulls -- but prohibiting interstate commerce in lions & tigers was accomplished only about five years ago.

Blogger cougar58  |  7/03/2009 9:28 PM  |  Flag  
The Animal Welfare Act, updated in 2008, is in fact a Federal law than bans fighting using any kind of animal. That establishes that the government can pass laws related to pit bulls (as well as birds) at the national level.

So if 200+ cities, and even entire counties (Prince George, MD) can pass BSL legislation, why shouldn't the Federal government do likewise at the national level, and protect the citizens of Indianapolis, Austin, Baltimore and LA just as it does the citizens of Denver, Miami, Cincinnati and 200 other cities?

Are pit bulls and their mixes any less dangerous in Indianapolis, Baltimore, LA and New York, than they are in Colorado or Florida or Ohio or Kansas? Are the lives of pets, livestock, children and adults of lesser value in one state than they are in another?

Blogger cougar58  |  7/03/2009 9:59 PM  |  Flag  
Might want to check out this state ban just passed (effective Oct 2009) in CT:

The law prohibits anyone from owning a potentially dangerous animal, which includes certain wild species of cat, dog, and bear. The bill greatly expands the number of species considered potentially dangerous.

By law, people cannot possess the following wildlife, or any hybrid of:

1. members of the cat family, including lions, leopards, cheetahs, jaguars, ocelots, jaguarundis, pumas (mountain lions), lynxes, and bobcats;

2. members of the dog family, including wolves and coyotes; and

3. members of the bear family, including the black bear, grizzly bear, and brown bear.

The bill also bans the possession of tigers, servals, caracals, jungle cats, and Savannah cats in the cat family; and foxes in the dog family.

It adds to the species of animals considered potentially dangerous, and thus illegal to possess, the:

1. hominidae, including gorillas, chimpanzees, and orangutans;

2. hylobatidae, including gibbons and lesser apes;

3. cercopithecidae, including baboons and macaques;

4. macropodidae, including kangaroos and wallabies;

5. mustelidae, including wolverines;

6. hyaenidae, including hyenas;

7. elephantidae, (elephants);

8. hippopotamidae, (the hippopotamus);

9. rhinocerotidae, (the rhinoceros);

10. suidae, including warthogs;

11. alligatoridae, including alligators and caimans;

12. crocodylidae, including crocodiles;

13. gavialidae, including gavials;

14. elapidae, including cobras, coral snakes, and mambas;

15. viperidae, including copperheads, rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, and all other adders and vipers;

16. rear-fanged members of the colubridae in the genera lothornis boiga, thelotornis, thabdophis, enhydris, dispholidus, clelia, rhabdophis, hydrodynastes, philodryas, and malpolon;

17. Burmese/Indian, African rock, amethystine, and reticulated pythons of the pythonidae;

18. the green, yellow, and dark spotted anacondas of the boidae;

19. the helodermatidae, including Gila monsters and beaded lizards; and

20. the Nile monitor, water monitor, black-throat monitor, white-throat monitor, crocodile monitor and komodo dragon of the varanidae.

Yet, the state of Ohio, as well as others, have declared pit bulls dangerous...does this mean if CT later deems Pit Bulls dangerous, they will be banned at the state level automatically?

Why are pit bulls declared dangerous in Ohio, but if you load them in the back of your '69 El Camino SS (next to your wife & Aunt Edna) and relocate them to Connecticut... they somehow magically become social & great at entertaining company again, and can be counted on only to bury their face in the neighbors crotch (referring to just the dog - not the wife &/or Aunt Edna..disclaimer: your actual results may vary depending on the type of wife & handling conditions)

Also, why are kangaroos banned as dangerous in CT, when zero people have been killed or even mauled (punched) by even one? I asked an owner in CT how he kept his roo from mauling and killing (AKA: KBRF)...his reply:

" I Tie me kangaroo down sport"

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/03/2009 10:08 PM  |  Flag  
Legislators, catering to the primate and reptile breeding lobby, have resisted regulation in the past.

It has taken deaths and media exposure to change that.

People should be aware that the primate and reptile breeding lobby interacts with the dog breeding lobby. These people know each other, and work toward the same end- fight any and all regulation.

Dog breeder lobbyist Christie Keith, for example, who poses as a "pet columnist" for the San Francisco Chronicle (but endlessly publishes dog breeder industry propaganda) also works for an organization called Pet Hobbyist dot com, which also represents reptile breeders and sellers as well.

These animal breeder lobbyists all scheme together!

It's a really nasty underworld that very few people were even aware of. Totally focused on profits without ethics or morality.

Anonymous Doug  |  7/03/2009 10:24 PM  |  Flag  
The representations from pit bull groups are no different than false representations made by tobacco and other makers of hazardous products. There is no end run around this reality. The scale and breadth is a national tragedy and must be addressed on a national level.

The pit bull lobby is not too big to fail. A national ban on pit bulls is a legislative imperative.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/04/2009 12:15 AM  |  Flag  
The above-mentioned Christie Keith is also in business with dog breeder lobbyist Gina Spadafori, another pseudo-journalist (formerly of the Sacramento Bee) who also lobbies against against any kind of regulation of the animal breeder industry.

They and their business, Pet Connections (along with ethically challenged veterinarian Marty Becker) have hooked up with Nathan Winograd and the No Kill Product.

They are pushing Winograd and No Kill because Winograd OPPOSES REGULATIONS AND LAWS THAT BEREEDERS DON'T LIKE.

This breeder lobbying business Pet Connection, sponsored Winograd's No Kill convention.

See how these lobbyists work together?

They all scratch each other's back to oppose regulation and keep the gravy train flowing, no matter how many people and pets get hurt and die.

All posing as "experts."

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/04/2009 1:38 AM  |  Flag  
Even if the federal government can't directly ban pit bulls, they can put the same sort of pressure on states that they did when raising the drinking age from 18 to 21 or from requiring strengthened DUI statutes. Cut federal health funding to any state that refuses to deal harshly with the pit epidemic.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/04/2009 5:39 AM  |  Flag  
The deal is that most folks love domesticated dogs and most breeds are breed with at least reasonable safety goals. The problem with the pits is that selection by dog fighters has pushed them through the realm of domestication and out the other side into something that is more dangerous than a predatory big cat.

The Pit breeding lobby has been successful at manipulating the legal blind spot afforded domesticated dogs.

Behind every mauling there is a Pit breeder lurking in the shadows, immune from product liabilty laws and most likely not paying taxes.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/04/2009 5:45 AM  |  Flag  
This pisse me off to no end as a Black Bear lover...Petey the Pit was poisoned on the set of the rascals, while Gentle Ben lived a long peaceful life! Yet one can't just buy a Black Bear!

I will fight for the right to buy a black bear cub out of the back of a pickup down at Wal-Mart.

Species discrimination must end!

Blogger cougar58  |  7/04/2009 10:54 AM  |  Flag  
Seems that Olivia Newton-John has taken issue with Connecticut banning Kangaroo's... Olivia had a pet roo named Thumper in her house for many years. "It's all in how you raise them"...says Ms Newton-John.

This could get interesting.

Blogger bitbypit  |  7/04/2009 12:54 PM  |  Flag  
Declaring a Dog Breed Dangerous (and subject to regulation) vs. Exotic pets. We have run across several instances where a municipality will declare a pit bull as part of their "prohibited" exotic pet list. In the Maquoketa, Iowa ordinance, "Section 4-1-7 KEEPING OF WILD ANIMALS PROHIBITED," pit bull terrier dogs are listed right after "Piranha fish" and just before " Pumas."
***
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2008/05/pit-bull-chases-boy-throws-self-at-two.html

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/04/2009 7:00 PM  |  Flag  
The question is where is the breaking point? The pit bull dilema will become greater and more problematic because the majority of truly responsible owners are spaying and neutering this dog. So that leaves the bad pits to proliferate. This will continue until a major humane society says enough. I encourage readers to write to Wayne Pasquelle, President of the Humane Society of the United States to make very public in their policies that the pit bull must be spayed and neutered across the United States both for humane reasons and public safety. Unless this happens and this organization campaigns around the country in legislatures and cities we will continue to have dead and butchered human beings and lots of dead pit bulls. It's an outrage that a few nutty people have had so much power over the will and rational thinking of the majority of people which is to regulate this dog.

Blogger cougar58  |  7/04/2009 7:19 PM  |  Flag  
..." pit bull terrier dogs" are listed right after "Piranha fish" and just before " Pumas."

The much older version of Section 4-1-7 had them listed just before "Pterodactyls".

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/05/2009 2:25 AM  |  Flag  
HSUS already belives that spaying and neutering in general should be done.

The problem is not HSUS.

It is groups like Best Friends, American Humane Association, ASPCA, and Bad Rap that have gotten involved with AKC types, breeders, dog fighters and oppose spaying and neutering laws.

It is these pit bull lobbies that get together and oppose things like spay neuter regulation. These are the humane groups that need to be dealt with.

Anonymous DB  |  7/05/2009 8:41 AM  |  Flag  
It will take many more deaths. Maybe a Senator's son? Just wait until one of these Senators family members becomes a victim.

There is no doubt the federal government could pass a federal bill. NO DOUBT.

Passing a federal ban on pit bulls would be the most controversial piece of legislation ever passed in the modern era. Isn't that pitiful, that people rally more for their god-forsaken pit bulls than healthcare, war, etc???

Anonymous MamaDog  |  7/05/2009 6:34 PM  |  Flag  
"Woman Survives Shark Attack in Miami: Shark takes a big chunk of leg, but misses artery"
http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/local/Shark-Bites-Woman-off-Miami-Beach.html

THE PIT "BITE" DID NOT MISS THE ARTERIES:

"The dog had tore into his calf and when he let go, he just snatched and pulled all the arteries out. He was lying on the steps, and when I checked his vital signs he was already dead then."
--
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2008/08/2008-fatality-detroit-man-killed-by.html

HERE'S MORE:

Pit Bull in Greensburg, Indiana Chews Off Owners Arm
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2008/06/pit-bull-in-greensburg-chews-off-owners.html

Flashback: Pit Bull Chews Off Owner's Arms in Texas
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2008/05/flashback-pit-bull-chews-off-owners.html

8-Year May Lose Arm After Trying to Save Dog from Pit Bull Attack
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2009/06/8-year-may-lose-arm-after-trying-to.html

Elkhart Pit Bull Owner May Suffer Amputation After "Redirected" Attack
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2009/02/elkhart-pit-bull-owner-may-suffer-arm.html

10-Year Old's Arm Amputated After Family Pit Bull Attack
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2008/07/10-year-olds-arm-amputated-after-family.html

Brenda Hill, 68, Attacked by Pit Bulls While Taking Out the Trash
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2009/01/indianapolis-woman-attacked-by-pit.html

2008 Fatality: Luna McDaniel, 83-Years Old, Dies from Pit Bull Injury
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2008/09/2008-fatality-luna-mcdaniel-83-years.html

Flashback: Cody Yelton 3-Years Old, Loses Arm in Pit Bull Attack
http://www.dogsbite.org/blog/2008/05/flashback-cody-yelton-3-years-old-loses.html

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/05/2009 8:11 PM  |  Flag  
A good percentage of pit bull breeders are addicts, who need a quick source of cash to support their habit. Pit bulls tend to have large litters, so an addict can easily make a quick 1K selling pit puppies for 100.00 a piece around the neighborhood, or on CL. Look at all the unvetted pit bull puppies for sale in the on-line free classified ads.....these people are desperate, and almost always from low income, high crime areas.

These breeders don't care if the dogs are sold to dogfighters, and they certainly don't care if they are breeding aggressive dogs. Why don't we shine a light into the seemy world of the pit bull BRREDDER? Regulating the breeding of pit bull would only HELP pit bulls by stopping the the types of criminals and lowlifes that breed and abuse them.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/06/2009 5:29 AM  |  Flag  
Here's the thing about the pit community...

Since they don't condemn it, they condone it!

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/06/2009 6:45 AM  |  Flag  
Which is why the AKC, UKC, and all the others fight so hard against regulation!

Anonymous Hank  |  7/06/2009 9:02 AM  |  Flag  
The trick is to draft legislation that bans interstate commerce of pit bulls. The US Congress can't ban possession of a pit bull because of the separation of powers between the federal government and the states. But under the Commerce Clause they can prohibit interstate commerce in pit bulls.

It would be a tough sell, but introduction of a bill would be a great way to stimulate debate and go on offense. Just make sure a good communications plan is in place. The pit bull breeders will be vocal and we'll need to be ready to counter that with a disciplined message that is repeated over and over and over. Think "flip flop" ala Bush/Cheney 04. Get that winning message and repeat repeat repeat.

Anonymous MamaDog  |  7/06/2009 4:06 PM  |  Flag  
The Humane Society of the United States agrees that "There Oughta Be Laws Against Exotic Pets"
---
http://hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2009/07/exotic-pets.html

"But there’s no reasonable political explanation for dithering on the issue of keeping dangerous exotic animals as pets. It seems perfectly foolish on its face to keep a lion, a chimpanzee, or a Burmese python as a pet. These wild animals live by the unforgiving code of nature and they are fully capable of killing adults. A woman in Connecticut was severely disfigured earlier this year by a pet chimp. They can make especially quick work of children."

Blogger Honesty Helps  |  7/07/2009 12:44 PM  |  Flag  
Just a few years ago a man was attacked by two chimps at a sanctuary as he and his wife were celebrating their chimp's birthday. Now their chimp is missing, escaped from the sanctuary last year and hasn't been seen since. They conducted an extensive search in the mountains of San Bernardino. So providing sanctuary for these animals is no guarantee that the public is safe. Providing anything other than bans for pits will continue to put the public in jeopardy.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/07/2009 7:54 PM  |  Flag  
Sen. Nelson calls for python legislation after girl's strangulation
---
http://www.nbc-2.com/Articles/readarticle.asp?articleid=31863&z=3

Anonymous Anonymous  |  7/10/2009 4:37 AM  |  Flag  
Don't be a Gimp, ban the Chimp!

Blogger P.  |  7/13/2009 10:17 PM  |  Flag  
Doug, the latest "report" from Best Fiends on the cost of BSL is done by a group that does "economics" for the tobacco industry. Hired guns are all they are. Prostitutes disguising themselves as economists, selling out the public to whomever can pay their price. They've been in court because of the lies of the tobacco industry. And absolutely no raw data is available to see where they were able to make these costs.

Anonymous Trigger  |  7/15/2009 12:02 PM  |  Flag  
"Monkey Bite" Bill Would Mean No Interstate Trade Of Primate Pets:
---
http://tinyurl.com/nu4s4g

"With the possible exception of disabled individuals who use primates as service animals, NO individual should have the right to own an inherently wild animal. This bill is important not so much because it will prevent maulings of people but because it will reduce the amount of suffering that captive primates endure..."

Anonymous Trigger  |  8/25/2009 1:16 PM  |  Flag  
The python owners are being charged:

"A 32-year-old man and the mother of a Florida girl suffocated by a pet python last month have been charged in the toddler's death. Jaren Ashley Hare, 19, and her boyfriend, Charles Jason Darnell, were each charged with manslaughter, third-degree murder and child abuse, said officials from the Sumter County Sheriff's Office."
--
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32553037/ns/us_news-crime_and_courts/

Post a Comment »

archives: