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Anonymous Henry  |  9/22/2008 10:01 AM  |  Flag  
I just downloaded and read the Ohio Dog Bite Book that you linked to. For those that don't have time to read it, an interesting statistic cited is that in Lucas County, OH animal control took in 50 pit bulls in 1993. In 2007 that number increased to 1,354. Of course most of those dogs are going to be put down out of necessity. Anyone that doesn't think the pit bull is a breed desparately in need of being reduced in number just isn't looking at the statistics. I just don't see how the people that claim to love pit bulls so much can't see that their fovorite breed benefits from breed specific laws.

Anonymous Trigger  |  11/22/2009 8:39 PM  |  Flag  
Dale Emch's testimony opposing House Bill 366
House Infrastructure, Homeland Security & Veterans Affairs Committee
Chairman Steve Reinhard January 30, 2008

"Chairman Reinhard, thank you for allowing me to address this committee on this controversial and important issue. I am testifying in opposition to House Bill 366 because I think it would be a mistake not to keep pit bulls labeled as vicious dogs under the state law. The law provides dog wardens like Tom Skeldon in Lucas County and law enforcement officials throughout the state with a powerful tool to regulate ownership of dogs that have the ability, and apparently the propensity, to cause tremendous harm to people.

I'm here today as an attorney who has dealt with the types of injuries pit bulls can cause in just a matter of seconds. In our Toledo law office, nine of the 23 dog bite cases we're handling involve pit bulls. That's 39 percent, which strikes me as being disproportionately high when you consider how many different breeds of dogs there are in our state. I recognize this is a such a small sampling that it is statistically meaningless in the broader context of this discussion, but it gives you at least a glimpse of what we're seeing. I'll leave it to Mr. Skeldon and his colleagues to provide the statistical information this committee needs to evaluate whether pit bulls should remain labeled as vicious dogs..."

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