Thursday, February 14, 2008


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11 comments:

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/15/2008 3:11 AM  |  Flag  
He misses the great insight that pit bulls are also amazing liars, which adds to their unpredictability. From a psychological sense, you might say these dogs are more like psychopaths than people with an anger management problem.

Even "soft worded" Randall Lockwood from the ASPCA has a thing or two to say about pit bulls and their amazing ability to lie. When speaking about "Fighting Breeds" in his Law Enforcement video, he says this:

-----

"The main impediment to reading a dog's communication is when the dog is a fighting breed. The best strategy for a fighting breed is to not communicate your intention.

This is why we hear about so may fighting breeds attacking without warning. Meaning there was no growl, there was no bark, there was no direct stare, the dog just went from point a to point b and did what he wanted to do.

But if you area fighting dog and the object is to inflict the most damage possible, a submissive gesture is just a new opening. In the early 80's, I started hearing from the Humane Society about the fighting breeds they were getting (and they did not know what they were getting). They would put that dog into a pen with a German Shepherd, and the German Shepherd speaks "dog," they play by wolf rules, and the German Shepherd would go belly up, and the pit bull would just disembowel him. They don't speak that language. They ignore that signal.

And that's one of the most devastating things we have done to fighting dogs. Is that we have destroyed their ability to speak good wolf or good dog. And they've taken it even one step further. The truly sinister communicator not only doesn't tell you what he feels or what he is going to do next. He lies to you.

Fighting dogs lie all the time. I experienced it first hand when I was investigating three pit bulls that killed a little boy in Georgia. When I went up to do an initial evaluation of the dog's behavior. The dog came up to the front of the fence, gave me a nice little tail wag and a "play bow" -- a little solicitation, a little greeting. As I got closer, he lunged for my face.

It was one of those "ah ha" experiences. Yeah, that would really work. That would really work in a dog pit. Because 99% of dogs are going to read that as "Oh boy I am your friend, let's play -- and there's my opening".

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/15/2008 1:35 PM  |  Flag  
There is a vote going on the issue of banning pit bulls from your community. Everyone ought to go there and vote. Go to Mikes article at australia.to/

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/15/2008 1:35 PM  |  Flag  
Wow...thank you for that quote. Very powerful. And it also explains why we hear so many owners insisting that their dog was gentle, and they never saw it coming when the dog, finally, attacks someone.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/15/2008 2:42 PM  |  Flag  
anonymous:
Could you please quote your reference for Lockwood's statement, I would love to use it in a paper I am writing.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/15/2008 4:07 PM  |  Flag  
Bibliography information regarding this video is listed at the bottom of this page, as well as provides a link to the video:
http://www.dogsbite.org/bite-statistics-bibliographies.htm

NOTE: Quote has been shortened slightly for relevancy reasons in this post. Disk 2, Communication Factors is where the whole thing can be found.

Or, I can post the whole thing if you want. It talks about how pits "disembowel" other dogs when they go "belly up," where as normal dogs see this as a sign of submission and leave the belly up dog alone.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/15/2008 4:44 PM  |  Flag  
Bravo for Mr. Scarlett. He has surfaced a very charged issue that calls for more awareness. Pit Bulls are dangerous one way or another. As a former Federal Law Enforcement Officer, I had been on several narcotics task forces which uncovered pit bulls acting as guards at homes where drug/meth labs were set up; I'm talking homes that were in nice suburban communities. We had no reservations in killing/capturing these dogs since they were trained to immediately attack any intruder. As I said, these dogs were in neighborhoods where children played.
Some colleagues of mine told me that they've seen pit bulls two years old and older mamime or kill children who parents had these dogs for pets. It's high time society takes a close look at these breeds regardless of what pit bull rescue leagues or other associations say.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/16/2008 4:01 AM  |  Flag  
I disagree with one point in the article. Dogs have a limited ability to reason and make choices every day.

Do I scale the fence and rip the 65 year old lady walking down the street apart or just stay in my yard and bark a few times?

When 20 humans are beating me with pipes and hammers and I am off property, do I retreat or keep mauling?

Should I pull the man off the riding lawn mower or run home with my tail between my legs?

Do I chase the kids inside the school and maul them or do I go home?

Don't laugh...These bizarre examples are taken from real maulings.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  2/16/2008 9:06 PM  |  Flag  
My wife's family had a pit bull once. And he was playful. He like to play and throw things in the air and catch them. One day we were watching him playing with what we thought were his furry toy. Upon closer examination we discovered it was a limbless, headless, torso of a cat. Eventually we found the rest of his limbs while we were preparing our garden. Once he got the taste of blood in his mouth he became very unpredictable and was never the same. So we gave him to my wife's grandmother as a guard dog in which he was very successful. He was so successful that he bit the maintenance man attempting to fix her hot water heater. He was then ordered by a court of law to be euthanized and that's the end of that.

Anonymous Anonymous  |  4/08/2009 7:53 AM  |  Flag  
Hi there,

Can anyone please advise me on the legal process after a vicious dog attack? My child was mauled by a friends dog. My child had 6 hours of plastic surgery on her face, ear and head. My child spent one week in hospital and is still having nightmares. The owners knew the dog was dangerous but failed to chain it up. What are our rights? We keep getting conflicting stories. Any advise would be helpful. Thanks concerned parent.

Blogger bitbypit  |  4/08/2009 12:18 PM  |  Flag  
Please join the DogsBite.org user forum!

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Blogger Packhorse  |  7/29/2011 2:40 PM  |  Flag  
Angry men love pitbulls. I know this from personal experience.

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